Join us for dinner, drinks, live music and dancing!

Estate @ 169

Happy Hour | 4pm-7pm

Live Music | 6pm -9pm

March 1st
Main Event

March 8th
Frank Cannistra

March 15th
Monk Rowe

March 29th
Easy Money Big Band

 

Happy Hour

$1 off all beers

2 for 1 cocktails & martinis

Buy 1 starter, get your second 1/2 off

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online.

This Lost Art Will Save You Strokes

By A.J. Avoli
Over time, a simple method for getting the ball from off the green to the flagstick fell out of favor.
I rarely see anyone chip like the late Hall of Fame golfer Paul Runyan. That’s a shame because this technique will make you more accurate around the greens with a lot less practice. Once you master the setup and learn to make a rhythmic stroke—like putting—you’ll start getting up and down more often. Let me show you how to chip old school. —With Ron Kaspriske
SCENARIO + SELECTION
Although you can use this shot in a lot of spots, it’s not all-purpose. Use this technique when you are no more than five yards from the green in the fringe or rough. Because this shot requires a stroke of consistent length and speed, the only thing you need to judge is which club to use to get the ball pin high. Visualize a small spot on the green where you think the ball should land to roll out to the hole. Then read the rest of the distance like a putt.
So which club to use? Take a little time on a practice green with your pitching wedge, 9-iron and 8-iron to see how far the ball carries and rolls using a stroke of the same length and speed. You can experiment with other clubs, too, but I’ve found sticking to these three brings about the most consistency.
SETUP + STROKE
Start by aiming the clubface at the small target where you want the ball to land. Remember, you have to read the green like a putt. That means if there is a slope, you might be playing the shot away from the cup. Now hold the club with medium grip pressure with its heel just off the ground (above). That’s really important to ensuring the club glides along the turf instead of digging into it.
You’ll notice the shaft is nearly vertical, with the handle leaning slightly toward the target and your weight favoring the left foot. Your arms should be relaxed, slightly bent and aligned parallel to the target. Ball position normally is just right of center in your stance, although you can alter it slightly as you experiment with how that changes the amount of carry and roll.
The stroke is as simple as it gets. It’s like a putting motion—the shoulders and arms do most of the work, and there’s no wristy movements. Focus on swinging the club with the same rhythm and force. The handle of the club should be swung no farther than the distance between your thighs. It’s a short swing equal in length on the backswing and follow-through.
The stroke should be aggressive or slightly accelerated, and always hold your finish to ensure a steady pace. If you’re struggling with that, say any two-word phrase with the first word coming on the backswing and the second word on the follow-through. A suggestion? Tick-Tock. Even better? Great-Chip or Hole-Out. I think you get the idea.
A.J. Avoli is one of Golf Digest’s Best Young Teachers. He is director of instruction at the Omni La Costa Resort & Spa in Carlsbad, Calif.
https://www.golfdigest.com/story/this-lost-art-will-save-you-strokes?fbclid=IwAR1w-6ZWIxxKRj9V8eXCv1atQ6O9Itf6L5hJ97PdH1JACyv2D4_VUbPwGX4

It’s Wedding Wednesday!

At Twin Ponds, we pride ourselves in our elegant event venue for weddings and banquets. With our experienced background we know that planning can become stressful for the bride or the banquet planner. So every Wednesday we’ll be posting a little bit more about ourselves as well as some tips and tricks for your special occasion!

Who Should Be There During Your First Look?

By Jen Glantz

Your wedding is a jam-packed day of special moments, but if you and your partner have decided to do a first look, that initial day-of meeting right before you and the love of your life commit to forever may be the most significant.

It’s usually a scene of intense emotion, from tears of joy to smiles of hope for the future. For some couples, it’s an experience they want to share with those who are closest to them, while others would rather keep the sacred interaction completely private.

Read on to find out the different options you have for your first look, and how to handle communicating your preference with your bridal party and close family members.

Make It One-on-One

As soon as you look into your partner’s eyes, it feels like you’re the only two people in the world, but if you want to be the only ones in the room literally, say so. Just let vendors (planners, photographers, and videographers), bridal party, and family members know well in advance. If they object, tell them you’ve been waiting a long time for this and have always envisioned it as an intimate few minutes exclusive to you and your fiancé. Then, fill them in on other special wedding day festivities they will get to witness or be a part of — helping you into your dress, tearing it up on the dance floor, or participating in a grand exit. Giving them something fun or meaningful to look forward to will distract from the disappointment of missing out on the first look.

If you still want the exchange documented, ask your photographer and/or videographer to set up a camera in the space beforehand and enable timed shots or a continuous recording.

Ask Only a Few Vendors

If you want to keep things look low-key, but want a heavier hand in securing the first look is properly documented and able to go off without a hitch, you may ask a few vendors to be present. Do you have both a photographer and a videographer? Have them work together ahead of time to find the perfect location, set up the lighting, and orchestrate anything else they need to ensure the first look is captured flawlessly.

A day-of coordinator or a wedding planner can also help facilitate by making sure the person you’re marrying is positioned with his or her back to you, so there’s that epic moment of surprise after he or she has turned around.

Have Loved Ones Nearby

There’s a good chance that your close family members have made mention that the first look is something they’d absolutely love to observe. If they haven’t — and you haven’t specifically spoken to them about a request for privacy — you can bet you’ll spot more than a few hiding in the bushes trying to get a peek anyways. To spare them the thorns, have your photographer or planner help you designate a nearby spot that will allow them to be spectators without you noticing them there. Alternatively, if you don’t mind being aware of their presence, you can position them at a close enough distance that their reactions are captured in the video and photos.

Again, no matter what your ultimate plan ends up being, be sure to let everyone know before it’s go-time. That way, everyone involved is prepared and onboard.

Source: https://www.brides.com/story/who-should-be-there-during-your-first-look

This Friday at Twin Ponds

Live music by DVD the Band
February 22nd

Join us for dinner, drinks, live music and dancing!

Estate @ 169
Happy Hour | 4pm-7pm
Live Music | 6pm-9pm

Happy Hour Specials:
$1 off all beers
2 for 1 cocktails & martinis
Buy 1 starter, get your second 1/2 off

 

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

 

How to Cure the Shanks

The fix for golf’s worst shot
By Keely Levins
We know, we know. You don’t even want to talk about the shanks for fear bringing the subject up will cause you to catch them. But like it or not, you might find yourself in a situation where you’re going to want to know a solution. Though awful, the plague of the shanks is curable.
First thing you have to do is take a break from the course. You need some alone time to sort this out on the range. Start by checking in on a few basics. Make sure you’re standing tall with your chest up during the swing, don’t hold the club too tightly, and make sure your weight isn’t sneaking up towards your toes. David Leadbetter told us that not tending to all of these little things could be the root of your struggles.
He also gave us a drill that will cure your shanking woes.
Set up like you’re going to hit it, and then put a tee in the ground just outside the toe of the club. While you’re swinging, think about keeping the grip end of the club near your body. “Miss the tee at impact, and you’ll hit the ball in the center of the face,” says Leadbetter.
Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/how-to-cure-the-shanks-there-we-said-it

Join us on Valentine’s Day for dinner
at the Estate @169!

 

Enjoy these Surf & Turf Specials:

5oz Filet w/ a 6oz Maine Lobster Tail
Twin 6oz Maine Lobster Tails

Come celebrate with us!

The restaurant will be open tomorrow.
February 14th
4pm-9pm

Make your reservation today!

 

Get better swing plane where it matters, near the ball

By Matthew Rudy
The same few words seem to pop up when describing Bryson DeChambeau’s game: Unique, quirky, or even strange.
What isn’t strange are the results. DeChambeau won his third career PGA Tour event at the Northern Trust, smashing the field by four shots with elite ball-striking using his single-length Cobra irons. DeChambeau hit 16 greens on Sunday on his way to his fourth round of 69 or lower at Ridgewood Country Club, and he made just six bogeys on the week.
The precision and consistency in DeChambeau’s game comes in part from his determination to make every swing on the same plane—literally. “I’ve run his swing on my 3D analysis software, and Bryson is literally more planar than the swing robots they use to design clubs,” says Golf Digest 50 Best Teacher Michael Jacobs. “Even if you wanted to try to do that yourself, I don’t think the average player has the coordination. He really is unique.”
But even with DeChambeau’s idiosyncratic method, there are things you can take away and use to tweak your game. “What gets weekend players in trouble is pushing and pulling on the club with too much force that’s perpendicular to the direction of the swing,” says Jacobs, who is based at Rock Hill Golf & Country Club in Manorville, NY. “That forcing of the club makes the club respond ‘out of plane,” which requires you to make a compensating move to recover.”
You don’t need to try to get your swing on a consistent plane throughout, as long as you can produce more consistency through the “execution phase,” says Jacobs—which is about hip high to hip high. “That’s where swing plane really matters,” he says. “Film your swing from down the line, with the camera on the ball line, and practice making swings where the club doesn’t move very much off the plane line in that phase. That’s going to come from a more neutral address position, where you aren’t aligning your shoulders, hips and feet at different targets, and from more neutral body motions. Get that phase down and you’re going to hit much more consistent shots.”
Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/steal-bryson-dechambeaus-secret-to-swing-consistency?fbclid=IwAR3X9BoXNIBzbhod3-_rCiWFhzl0sNFHXueGP_q-8irRDNpqnvQN8xvPN-U

It’s Wedding Wednesday!

At Twin Ponds, we pride ourselves in our elegant event venue for weddings and banquets. With our experienced background we know that planning can become stressful for the bride or the banquet planner. So every Wednesday we’ll be posting a little bit more about ourselves as well as some tips and tricks for your special occasion!

These 2019 Groom & Groomsmen Trends Are Super Dapper

Written by: Jaqueline Tynes

Wondering what’s on the radar for 2019 groom and groomsmen trends? When it comes to what is hot right now in menswear, we’ve got you covered. From bold colors to slick velvet suits these 2019 groom and groomsmen trends will make any guy feel handsome on his wedding day.

Here are the top 2019 groom and groomsmen trends.

Photo left to right: Willow & Wine | Allison Jeffers Wedding Photography

Texture is everywhere

Velvet, tweed, and other richly-textured fabrics are giving suits, ties, and more a major upgrade. These tactile fabrics are elevating the standard suit and tie with their warm and inviting appearance and feel. From soft velvets to woven tweed, texture can definitely add interest to your wedding day-look.

Red carpet-inspired accessories

If you’re a bit of a daredevil when it comes to your fashion choices and want to wear something that’s a bit risqué—think Timothée Chalamet or Michael B. Jordan on the red carpet—then you’ll definitely dig this new menswear accessory. Novelty bibs, or harnesses (if you’re into that kind of thing) are the next fad in menswear that we can totally see risk-taking grooms sporting on their big day. Designed by Louis Vuitton and currently going viral after several award shows, these edgy pieces are perfect for grooms with a, ahem, wild side.

Photo left to right: Chris J Evans Photography | Eric & Jamie Photography

Playful patterns

Unique patterns like floral ties and houndstooth suits are giving grooms the ability to show off their personalities. Fun, bold patterns are making menswear more eye-catching in 2019—much different than the classic solid suit styles. Groomsmen can even get in on the action by coordinating with the groom and wearing a patterned tie—like the popular floral print we’ve been seeing for spring and summertime weddings.

Photo left to right: UNIQUE LAPIN Photography | CivicPhotos

Bright and bold colors

We’ve seen navy as the classic color of choice for menswear in past seasons, but this year brighter hues are taking over (totally aligned with the wedding colors of 2019). Vibrant colors like, burgundy and green, are adding a modern twist to suit styles and let grooms make a statement on their big day. Steering away from traditional neutrals, like black or grey, these louder colors can be worn as accent pieces or full suits and are totally made for trendy grooms or groomsmen.

Lucas Rossi Photography

Mix and match styles

As well as burgundies and other bright hues, we’re also seeing colors being mixed-and-matched in menswear this year. Black and blues are being paired together to create a sophisticated and formal look for grooms, whereas groomsmen are mixing and matching their suits and ties. Opting for different suits or different colors gives your overall look a fresh twist that’s totally in for 2019 weddings.

 

Source: https://www.weddingwire.com/wedding-ideas/groom-groomsmen-trends

Learn how to turn back, not sway.

By Keely Levins
Let’s talk about hip turn. James Kinney, one of our Golf Digest Best Young Teachers and Director of Instruction at GolfTec Omaha, says that from the data GolfTec has collected, they’ve found lower handicap golfers have a more centered lower body at the top of the swing. Meaning, they don’t sway.
If you’re swaying off the ball, you’re moving yourself off of your starting position. The low point of your swing moves back when you sway back, so you’re going to have to shift forward to get your club to bottom out where the ball is. That takes a lot of timing, and is going to end up producing some ugly shots.
So, instead, Kinney says you should turn.
“When turning your hips, you are able to stay more centered over the golf ball in your backswing and the low point of your swing stays in the proper position, resulting in consistent contact.”
To practice turning, Kinney says to set up in a doorway. Have your back foot against the doorframe. When you make your lower body move back, your hip will hit the door fame if you’re swaying. If you’re turning, your hips are safe from hitting the frame.
Remember that feeling of turning when you’re on the course and your ball striking is going to get a whole lot more consistent.
Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/how-a-doorframe-can-help-your-golf-swing