It’s Wedding Wednesday!

At Twin Ponds, we pride ourselves in our elegant event venue for weddings and banquets. With our experienced background we know that planning can become stressful for the bride or the banquet planner. So every Wednesday we’ll be posting a little bit more about ourselves as well as some tips and tricks for your special occasion!

How to Seat Your Guests at the Wedding Reception

It’s one of the final tasks on your to-do list. Here’s how to make playing musical chairs a breeze.
by The Knot
If you’re having 25 guests at a buffet, you may or may not want to give people specific seating assignments. But if you’re having 75 guests or more and serving a seated meal, you’ll want to make sure everyone’s got a specific place to sit. Why? For one, people like to know where they’re sitting—and that you took the time to choose where they should sit, and with whom. It’s also helpful if you’re serving several different entrée choices, because the caterer can figure out beforehand how many chicken, beef and vegetarian dishes a given table gets, because they know who’s sitting there. Read on for stress-free tips on how to seat your guests.

1. Start Early

There are couples who’ve been at kitchen tables the night before the wedding (or even wedding morning) just starting their seating chart. Don’t let this be you—you’ve got more important things to think about at that point. Sure, it’s fine to make last-minute changes, but try to get the chart mostly done at least a week before the day.

2. Break It Down

Create a new spreadsheet. If you haven’t already, insert a column into your guest list document categorizing all the invitees by relationship: your friends, your family, your partner’s friends, your partner’s family, your family friends, your partner’s family friends and so on. This way, you’ll be able to easily sort the list and break it down into more logical table assortments. Now you’ll need to separate these lists into distinct tables.

4. Create a Paper Trail

If you’re more visual, draw circles (for tables) on a big sheet of paper and write names inside them (make sure you know how many people can comfortably be seated at each table). Or you could write every guest’s name on a sticky note and place it accordingly.

4. Head Up the Head Table—or Don’t

A traditional head table is not round, but long and straight, and it’s generally set up along a wall, on risers, facing all the other reception tables. Usually the newlyweds sit smack-dab in the middle (where everyone can see them), with the maid of honor next to the groom, the best man next to the bride, and then boy/girl out from there. But you don’t have to do it that way. All the bridesmaids can sit on the bride’s side, and all the groomsmen on the groom’s. Or maybe you’re not into being on display, or you don’t want your wedding party to feel isolated from other guests. Let your wedding party sit at a round reception table or two with each other and/or with their dates, and have a sweetheart table for the two of you (to get a little one-on-one time). Another option: You two sit with your parents and let that be the head table, with the wedding party at their own tables.

5. Place Your Parents

Traditionally, your parents and your partner’s parents sit at the same table, along with grandparents, siblings not in the wedding party, and the officiant and their spouse if they attend the reception. But if your or your partner’s parents are divorced and are uncomfortable about sitting next to each other, you might want to let each set of parents host their own table of close family and/or friends. This could mean up to four parents’ tables, depending on your situation—or have the divorced parent who raised you (or your partner) and their spouse/date sit at the table with still-married parents.

Remember, the parent-seating question is a flexible one. Set it up in whatever way best suits everybody. If you’re unsure, don’t hesitate to talk to the parents in question about it before you make your final decision.

6. Tame Tensions

There may also be situations in which certain family members just do notget along. Maybe they haven’t spoken in years. Maybe the last time they saw each other at the last family wedding there was a drunken fight. Understandably, you want to keep them as far apart as possible. Think about these kinds of relationships (or lack thereof) before you even start making your chart, so you can take them into consideration in the first place and begin by seating Aunt Jane at table three and Aunt Lucy across the room at table 15. Trust us—they’ll appreciate it.

7. Provide Reunion Time

All of your college or high school friends will be psyched to sit at a table together. It also gives them all an opportunity to catch up with each other.

Written by: The Knot

Source:https://www.theknot.com/content/how-to-seat-guests-at-wedding-reception

Wide = Far: How to get more out of your full-swing shots

Written by: Keely Levins

The Jutanugarn sisters had one heck of a 2018. Older sib Moriya picked up her first LPGA Tour victory, while Ariya won the U.S. Women’s Open title, was LPGA player of the year and moved to the top of the Rolex Women’s World Golf Rankings. So when they give advice on better ball-striking, it’s wise to listen.

One of Moriya’s favorite drills to hit it higher and farther is as simple as it gets.

Take any full-swing club and set up to the ball normally. Now adjust your feet so they are several inches wider apart, and then start hitting shots.

“We call it the flat-feet drill,” Moriya says. “It helps shallow out your angle of attack, which is going to help you hit it more solidly using the club’s proper loft.”

Moriya also uses this drill to slow hip rotation, which improves her swing’s timing. And a wider stance has a benefit for amateurs: It helps prevent the common fault of swinging with weight on your back foot to try to “help” the ball up. Your weight should shift into your lead foot in the downswing.

To improve this drill, alternate hitting 10 balls with the wider stance and then 10 with your normal stance.

 

Written by: Keely Levins

Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/wide-far-how-to-get-more-out-of-your-full-swing-shots-moriya-jutanugarn

Happy Hour & Live Music by Easy Money Big Band tonight!

Happy Hour 4pm-7pm
Live Music & Dancing 5:30pm-9pm

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

Music by Easy Money Big Band & Happy Hour at Twin Ponds

 

January 25th
Happy Hour 4pm-7pm
Live Music & Dancing 5:30pm-9pm

 

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

It’s Wedding Wednesday!

At Twin Ponds, we pride ourselves in our elegant event venue for weddings and banquets. With our experienced background we know that planning can become stressful for the bride or the banquet planner. So every Wednesday we’ll be posting a little bit more about ourselves as well as some tips and tricks for your special occasion!

First things first,

We would like to welcome you to the fourth generation of superlative levels of service and culinary expertise where every guest is a VIP and every visit is special.

Once you travel up the majestic drive and take in the panoramic views, exquisite floral gardens, meticulously manicured greens, and the beautifully refashioned interior you will be welcomed by Traditions of Elegance, Creative Culinary Knowledge and Service Standards that have been the pinnacle of our business for over 65 years. The Girmonde Family and the professional staff at Twin Ponds Golf & Country Club invite you, whether for business or pleasure, to come embody an experience that will truly be unsurpassed.

Join us this Friday for happy hour and live music by Easy Money Big Band!

 

January 25th
Happy Hour 4pm-7pm
Live Music & Dancing 5:30pm-9pm

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

You’ll Pitch Better If You Don’t Hang Back

By: David Leadbetter

Great advice to remember when hitting pitch shots is to swing through impact on a shallow angle, letting the bottom of the clubhead slide along the turf.

Having said that, I’ve seen the application of this advice prove troublesome for some amateurs, because they try to do it off the wrong foot—the back foot. This typically happens because the golfer wants to help get the ball in the air with some unnecessary hand and body english. There’s no need for that. Wedges have more than enough loft to produce a high-and-soft shot, especially if the angle of attack is shallow—think skim, not dig.

So what I want you to do is make sure your body is being supported by your lead foot as you swing through impact. An easy way to ingrain this into your pitching game is with the classic step drill. It’s reminiscent of Gary Player’s signature move of walking toward the target in a seemingly continuous motion after he struck the ball. In this drill, swing down feeling all of your weight shift into the front foot. As your club is about to meet the ball from that shallow approach, your back foot should be off the ground and starting to move toward the target. Hit the shot and step forward as you see me doing here.

Getting your weight forward is going to help make your pitching game much more reliable.


MORE FANCY FOOTWORK: THIS ONE CURES THE SHANKS
Shank one shot, you try to brush it off and move on. Shank the next? Full panic sets in. Before you walk off the course and put your clubs on eBay, let me help. First, understand that the shanks most often occur when the golfer has moved too close to the ball at impact. Sometimes we unknowingly drift toward our toes as we swing, and this causes the club to strike the ball near or on the hosel. So what can you do? TRY THIS: At address, lift your toes inside your shoes (below), and keep them up when you swing. This will prevent you from moving toward the ball and clanking one off the hosel.

—With Ron Kaspriske

 

By: David Leadbetter
Source: https://www.golfdigest.com/story/youll-pitch-better-if-you-dont-hang-back

Live Music featuring DVD the Band

Come see us tonight!
Happy Hour 4pm-7pm
Live Music & Dancing 6pm-9pm

Call (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

Happy Hour Fridays @ The Estate at 169

Specials:
2 for 1 cocktails & martinis
$1 off all beers
Buy 1 starter, get your second 1/2 off

5 tips to help you keep your golf resolutions in 2019

Written by: T.J. Auclair

The new year has arrived and a lot of you golfers out there might be uttering the words, “new year, new me.”

Most of us make New Year’s resolutions and, unfortunately, most of us fail to see them through for all 365 days.

If your resolution involved improving your golf game in 2019, here’s a list of things you can do every day/week — even if you’re in the bitter cold like a lot of folks right now — to help you achieve those goals.

And, once it warms up in your area, you can take all five of these drills outside.

5. Exercise. Yeah, we know. That’s what we should be doing every day anyway, right? But when it comes to golf, you don’t want to be tight. There are a number of stretches you can do right from your desk while reading emails that will benefit your arms, shoulders, neck, back, hips and legs for golf season.

Even better, place one of those handy, elastic, tension bands in the top drawer of your desk.

4. Take 100 swings per day in your house or garage… without a golf ball. The best players in the world visualize the shot they want to hit before they hit it. With a drill like this one, you’re going to be forced to visualize, because there’s no ball there to hit. If you’re able, place a mirror in front of you and pay attention to the positions of your address, takeaway, the top of your swing and impact position as well as follow through. Do it in slow motion. Become an expert on your swing.

3. Work on your chipping. Can’t do it outside? No worries. You can purchase a chipping net, or even put down a hula-hoop as a target. Get a few foam golf balls and a tiny turf mat to hit the balls off of.

Will it produce the same feel as a real golf ball? Of course not. But what it will do is force you to focus on a target and repeat the same motion over and over. After a long layoff, “touch,” is the first thing that goes for all golfers.

This will help you to work on some semblance of touch all winter long.

2. Practice your putting. Anywhere. All you need is a putter, a golf ball, a flat surface and an object — any object — to putt at. If you’re so inclined, rollout turf can be purchased for around $20 with holes cut out.

Since the greens are where you’re going to take most of your strokes, doesn’t it make sense to dial that in whenever possible? It can be fun too. Does your significant other, roommate, or child play? Have regular putting contests.

The feel you gain during those sessions may not seem like much, but man will they come in handy when your season begins on the real grass.

1. Make a weekly appointment with your PGA Professional. Even in areas of the country that are suffering through the cruelest of winter conditions, you can always find a place to hit golf balls inside. Contact your local PGA Professional to find out where places like this in your area exist. You might be surprised at all the options you have.

With your PGA Professional in tow, you can work on your swing throughout the winter months and keep your game sharp. How nice would it be to be on top of your game as soon as the courses in your area open in the spring?

 

Written by: T.J. Auclair
Source: https://www.pga.com/news/golf-buzz/5-tips-help-keep-your-golf-resolutions-in-2019

Happy Hour & Live Music this Friday!

 

Live Music by Frank Cannistra
6pm-9pm

Happy Hour Fridays @ The Estate at 169
4pm-7pm

Specials:
2 for 1 cocktails & martinis
$1 off all beers
Buy 1 starter, get your second 1/2 off

Call us at (315) 736-9303 to make a dinner reservation or reserve online

 

Upcoming:

Friday, January 18th
Live music & dancing featuring: DVD the Band

Friday, January 25th
Live music & dancing featuring: Easy Money Big Band